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The Grimm Conclusion

Cover of The Grimm Conclusion

The Grimm Conclusion

Grimm Series, Book 3
Borrow Borrow Borrow

Once upon a time, fairy tales were grim.

Cinderella's stepsisters got their eyes pecked out by birds.

Rumpelstiltskin ripped himself in half.

And in a tale called "The Mouse, the Bird, and the Sausage," a mouse, a bird, and a sausage all talk to each other. Yes, the sausage talks. (Okay, I guess that one's not that grim...)

Those are the real fairy tales.

But they have nothing on the story I'm about to tell.

This is the darkest fairy tale of all. Also, it is the weirdest. And the bloodiest.

It is the grimmest tale I have ever heard.

And I am sharing it with you.

Two children venture through forests, flee kingdoms, face ogres and demons and monsters, and, ultimately, find their way home. Oh yes, and they may die. Just once or twice.

That's right. Fairy tales
Are
Awesome.

Once upon a time, fairy tales were grim.

Cinderella's stepsisters got their eyes pecked out by birds.

Rumpelstiltskin ripped himself in half.

And in a tale called "The Mouse, the Bird, and the Sausage," a mouse, a bird, and a sausage all talk to each other. Yes, the sausage talks. (Okay, I guess that one's not that grim...)

Those are the real fairy tales.

But they have nothing on the story I'm about to tell.

This is the darkest fairy tale of all. Also, it is the weirdest. And the bloodiest.

It is the grimmest tale I have ever heard.

And I am sharing it with you.

Two children venture through forests, flee kingdoms, face ogres and demons and monsters, and, ultimately, find their way home. Oh yes, and they may die. Just once or twice.

That's right. Fairy tales
Are
Awesome.

Available formats-
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
    4.5
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
    MG
  • Text Difficulty:
    3

Recommended for you


Excerpts-
  • From the book

    A wicked stepfamily

    It was morning, and Jorinda and Joringel's stepfather was in the kitchen with his daughters, taking big red apples from a marketing basket and putting them in a large chest with a big heavy lid and a sharp brass lock, when Jorinda and Joringel came in.

    Jorinda, seeing the lovely apples, said, "Stepfather, may I have an apple?"

    The man said, "Of course, my dear." And he handed the little girl an apple. The stepsisters scowled.

    And then Joringel said, "Stepfather, may I have an apple, too?"

    "NO!" the man bellowed. And he snatched the apple back from Jorinda, threw it into the chest, and slammed the heavy lid shut.

    The stepsisters laughed loudly.

    ALSO BY

    Adam Gidwitz

    A Tale Dark & Grimm In a Glass Grimmly

    Once upon a time, fairy tales were grim.

    The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the word grim as "ghastly, repellent, or sinister in character." Their example of how to use the word is this: "a grim tale." (Really! It says that!)

    Once upon a time, fairy tales were Grimm, too. That is, they were collected by the brothers Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm.

    You know the tales of the Brothers Grimm.

    For example, raise your hand if you've ever heard of a story called "Little Red Riding Hood."

    You haven't?

    Oh, you have. Then why aren't you raising your hand? Go ahead and raise it. I don't care how stupid you look, sitting in the corner of the library by yourself, or on the school bus, or in bed at night, raising your hand for no apparent reason. How else am I supposed to know whether you've read "Little Red Riding Hood"?

    Raise it.

    Thank you.

    Okay, raise your hand if you've heard of "Hansel and Gretel."

    Do it.

    Thanks.

    Raise your hand if you've heard of "Rumpelstiltskin." (I assume you're raising your hand.)

    "Sleeping Beauty." (Your hand's still up, right?)

    "Snow White." (Of course you have.)

    "Cinderella." (Your hand better still be in the air.)

    But now you're thinking: Wait a minute. You said fairy tales used to be grim—i.e., ghastly, repellent, sinister. These stories aren't ghastly, repellent, or sinister at all. They are cute, and sweet, and boring.

    And, I must admit, these days you are correct. The versions of these stories that most people tell are indeed cute and sweet and incredibly, mind-numbingly, want-to-hit-yourself-in-the-head-with-a-sledgehammer-ingly boring.

    But the original fairy tales were not.

    Take "Rumpelstiltskin," for example. You may know "Rumpelstiltskin" as a funny little tale about a funny little man with a funny not-all-that-little name.

    But do you remember what happens at the end of that funny little story? The girl guesses his name, right? And he gets very angry. And do you remember what happens then?

    No?

    Well, in some versions of the story, Rumpelstiltskin stamps his foot and flies out the window.

    Which makes no sense. Who has ever stamped their foot and suddenly gone flying out of a window? Impossible.

    In other versions of the story, he stamps his foot and shatters into a thousand pieces.

    This is even more ridiculous than him flying out of a window. People don't shatter. People are fleshy and bloody and gooey. Shatter is not something that people do.

    So what actually happens when the girl guesses Rumpelstiltskin's name? In the real, Grimm version of the story?

    Well, he stamps his foot so hard that it gets buried three feet in the ground. Then he grabs his other leg, and he pulls up on it with such force that he rips...

Reviews-
  • DOGO Books ilovecheese - This was a beautiful book: a fantastic end to the 'series'. It featured impeccable humor and wit, as well as horrifying bloody scenes. There are some parts that seem slightly forced, but they are for the most part overshadowed by the good points of the book. I would recommend this to fans of the series ages ten and up.
  • Publisher's Weekly

    Starred review from September 30, 2013
    If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, and Gidwitz deploys his successful formula of bloody happenings and narratorial intrusion in his third and final installment of unexpurgated fairy tales. The protagonists are Jorinda and Joringel, who go through hair-raising and stomach-churning travails similar to those of their predecessors, Hansel and Gretel (in A Tale Dark & Grimm) and Jack and Jill (from In a Glass Grimmly); there are even a few cameo appearances by characters from the earlier books. Among the sources this time are “Cinderella” and “Sleeping Beauty,” lesser-known tales such as “The Juniper Tree” and “The Boy Who Left Home to Find Fear,” and a few non-Grimm tales. Reflecting his love of theory, Gidwitz takes an excursion into metafiction near the end that highlights the power of story, one of two key themes, along with the folly of repressing one’s feelings. Underneath the gore, the wit, and the trips to Hell and back, this book makes it clearer than ever that Gidwitz truly cares about the kids he writes for. Ages 10–up. Agent: Sarah Burnes, the Gernert Company.

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    Penguin Young Readers Group
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The Grimm Conclusion
The Grimm Conclusion
Grimm Series, Book 3
Adam Gidwitz
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