Close cookie details

This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Hide notification

  Main Nav
The End of Epidemics
Cover of The End of Epidemics
The End of Epidemics
The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It

"Dr. Quick's urgent message makes one hope that this book will reach a huge audience and that its exhortations will be acted on everywhere." - Meredith Wadman, The Wall Street Journal

A leading doctor offers answers on the one of the most urgent questions of our time: How do we prevent the next global pandemic?

The 2014 Ebola epidemic in Liberia terrified the world—and revealed how unprepared we are for the next outbreak of an infectious disease. Somewhere in nature, a killer virus is boiling up in the bloodstream of a bird, bat, monkey, or pig, preparing to jump to a human being. This not-yet-detected germ has the potential to wipe out millions of lives over a matter of weeks or months. That risk makes the threat posed by ISIS, a ground war, a massive climate event, or even the dropping of a nuclear bomb on a major city pale in comparison.

In The End of Epidemics, Harvard Medical School faculty member and Chair of the Global Health Council Dr. Jonathan D. Quick examines the eradication of smallpox and devastating effects of influenza, AIDS, SARS, and Ebola. Analyzing local and global efforts to contain these diseases and citing firsthand accounts of failure and success, Dr. Quick proposes a new set of actions which he has coined "The Power of Seven," to end epidemics before they can begin. These actions include:

- Spend prudently to prevent disease before an epidemic strikes, rather than spending too little, too late
- Ensure prompt, open, and accurate communication between nations and aid agencies, instead of secrecy and territorial disputes
- Fight disease and prevent panic with innovation and good science

Practical and urgent, The End of Epidemics is crucial reading for citizens, health professionals, and policy makers alike.

"Dr. Quick's urgent message makes one hope that this book will reach a huge audience and that its exhortations will be acted on everywhere." - Meredith Wadman, The Wall Street Journal

A leading doctor offers answers on the one of the most urgent questions of our time: How do we prevent the next global pandemic?

The 2014 Ebola epidemic in Liberia terrified the world—and revealed how unprepared we are for the next outbreak of an infectious disease. Somewhere in nature, a killer virus is boiling up in the bloodstream of a bird, bat, monkey, or pig, preparing to jump to a human being. This not-yet-detected germ has the potential to wipe out millions of lives over a matter of weeks or months. That risk makes the threat posed by ISIS, a ground war, a massive climate event, or even the dropping of a nuclear bomb on a major city pale in comparison.

In The End of Epidemics, Harvard Medical School faculty member and Chair of the Global Health Council Dr. Jonathan D. Quick examines the eradication of smallpox and devastating effects of influenza, AIDS, SARS, and Ebola. Analyzing local and global efforts to contain these diseases and citing firsthand accounts of failure and success, Dr. Quick proposes a new set of actions which he has coined "The Power of Seven," to end epidemics before they can begin. These actions include:

- Spend prudently to prevent disease before an epidemic strikes, rather than spending too little, too late
- Ensure prompt, open, and accurate communication between nations and aid agencies, instead of secrecy and territorial disputes
- Fight disease and prevent panic with innovation and good science

Practical and urgent, The End of Epidemics is crucial reading for citizens, health professionals, and policy makers alike.

Available formats-
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    0
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Text Difficulty:

Recommended for you

About the Author-
  • Dr. Jonathan Quick is Senior Fellow at Management Sciences for Health in Boston. He is an instructor of medicine at the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chair of the Global Health Council. He has conducted research on infectious disease in more than seventy countries. He lives in Massachusetts.
Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    November 13, 2017
    Quick, a senior fellow at Management Sciences for Health, and Fryer, a former senior editor for the Harvard Business Review, lay out a seven-step action plan for stopping epidemics in this informative, if stiff, treatise. The plan is based on their analysis of global response to five epidemics (smallpox, influenza, AIDS, SARS, and Ebola), which have killed more than 500 million people over the last century. The authors urge nations to learn from past mistakes in dealing with killer diseases and to make pandemic prevention a global priority. They argue that this can be accomplished by developing a worldwide early warning system and a network of response teams. Presenting the cost of epidemics both in terms of lives and dollars, Quick and Fryer estimate that countries can expect to spend a trillion dollars over the next decade and that the next worldwide pandemic could cost the global economy up to $2.5 trillion. However, by adopting “the right preventive and response measures at the right times,” that loss will be substantially reduced. Without excess alarmism, Quick and Fryer show that such factors as climate change, terrorism, and the global food system put the next pandemic just around the corner. Agent: Todd Shuster, Aevitas.

  • Kirkus

    November 15, 2017
    A veteran global health professional explores the methods for preventing pandemics, an ever present threat to humankind.Quick, an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chair of the Global Health Council, begins by assessing the many threats: overpopulation and expanded mobility thanks to travel or as a result of war; economic failings; weather disasters that lead to migrant movements and often end with malnourished masses in unsanitary camps; bioterrorism (it is remarkably easy to make ricin or spread anthrax); global warming, which is creating new environs for mosquitoes and other disease bearers; and factory farming, which is already leading to massive destructions of flocks to control bird flu. As a solution, the author offers his "Power of Seven" precepts: strong national leadership; resilient health care systems; research to promote active prevention and constant readiness; trustworthy communications; scientific innovation; resources and investment; strong networks of citizen activists (see what ACT UP volunteers were able to accomplish in the fight against AIDS). These are all fine approaches, and Quick's chapters elaborating past failures when one or more of these guidelines was lacking are exemplary, as are his success stories. But are they viable in today's world? For these approaches to work, there would need to be significant political will, doubtful given the trends toward authoritarian and xenophobic regimes. Perhaps the greater hurdle is the polarization of society and a growing lack of trust. The anti-vaccination believers and the West African communities who killed the medical workers who came to tell them not to touch their Ebola-dead relatives are painful examples of fear and distrust that no amount of reason will reverse. What can work is better communication at a local level, from peers. Another positive Quick points to is the success achieved through broad public-private collaborations, which have increased worldwide vaccination rates and expanded access to AIDS drugs in Africa.Sobering reading for public health officials and infectious disease students and perhaps inspiration for would-be activists to get busy. For general readers: get your flu shot.

    COPYRIGHT(2017) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Library Journal

    December 1, 2017

    Quick (Harvard Medical Sch.) and collaborator Fryer (formerly with the Harvard Business Review) write about the increasing prevalence and likelihood of global pandemics and the value of prevention. The financial implications could be staggering, but how quickly people seem to forget the lessons of Ebola, MERS, SARS, and Zika, as well as HIV, mad cow, and the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic. With global warming and international air travel, no country is immune. Improved vaccines and better diagnostics are needed to quickly identify and treat emerging diseases. There is good news, however. Epidemiologists have gotten better at predicting and treating disease outbreaks. Quick praises the Center for Disease Control's (underfunded) Epidemic Intelligence Service and Canada's Global Public Health Intelligence Network. Innovative approaches to vaccine development and mosquito control exist. Projects such as the Global Virome Project or UNAID's PREDICT and Emerging Pandemic Threats improve disease surveillance. The Gates Foundation, World Bank, WHO, and creative public-private partnerships offer possibilities. The threats are real, but a sense of urgency is lacking. VERDICT For readers interested in their own well-being and public health as well as ways to advocate for issues of great concern and urgency. Complements Sonia Shah's Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond, Peter C. Doherty's Pandemics: What Everyone Needs To Know, and David Quammen's Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic.--Mary Chitty, Cambridge Healthtech, Needham, MA

    Copyright 2017 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Kirkus Reviews "Sobering reading for public health officials and infectious disease students and perhaps inspiration for would-be activists to get busy. For general readers: get your flu shot."
Title Information+
  • Publisher
    St. Martin's Press
  • Kindle Book
    Release date:
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

Status bar:

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You've reached the maximum number of titles you can recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 5 titles every 7 day(s).

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

Close

Enhanced Details

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
The End of Epidemics
The End of Epidemics
The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It
Dr. Jonathan D. Quick
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.
Clicking on the 'Buy It Now' link will cause you to leave the library download platform website. The content of the retail website is not controlled by the library. Please be aware that the website does not have the same privacy policy as the library or its service providers.
Close
Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

You will be prompted to sign into your library account on the next page.

If this is your first time selecting “Send to NOOK,” you will then be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel