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Tomorrow Will Be Different
Cover of Tomorrow Will Be Different
Tomorrow Will Be Different
Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality
Borrow Borrow Borrow
"A brave, powerful memoir." PEOPLE
A captivating memoir that will change the way we look at identity and equality in this
country


Before she became the first transgender person to speak at a national political convention in 2016 at the age of twenty-six, Sarah McBride struggled with the decision to come out—not just to her family but to the students of American University, where she was serving as student body president. She'd known she was a girl from her earliest memories, but it wasn't until the Facebook post announcing her truth went viral that she realized just how much impact her story could have on the country.
Four years later, McBride was one of the nation's most prominent transgender activists, walking the halls of the White House, advocating inclusive legislation, and addressing the country in the midst of a heated presidential election. She had also found her first love and future husband, Andy, a trans man and fellow activist, who complemented her in every way . . . until cancer tragically intervened.
Informative, heartbreaking, and profoundly empowering, Tomorrow Will Be Different is McBride's story of love and loss and a powerful entry point into the LGBTQ community's battle for equal rights and what it means to be openly transgender. From issues like bathroom access to health care to gender in America, McBride weaves the important political and cultural milestones into a personal journey that will open hearts and change minds.
As McBride urges: "We must never be a country that says there's only one way to love, only one way to look, and only one way to live."
The fight for equality and freedom has only just begun.
"A brave, powerful memoir." PEOPLE
A captivating memoir that will change the way we look at identity and equality in this
country


Before she became the first transgender person to speak at a national political convention in 2016 at the age of twenty-six, Sarah McBride struggled with the decision to come out—not just to her family but to the students of American University, where she was serving as student body president. She'd known she was a girl from her earliest memories, but it wasn't until the Facebook post announcing her truth went viral that she realized just how much impact her story could have on the country.
Four years later, McBride was one of the nation's most prominent transgender activists, walking the halls of the White House, advocating inclusive legislation, and addressing the country in the midst of a heated presidential election. She had also found her first love and future husband, Andy, a trans man and fellow activist, who complemented her in every way . . . until cancer tragically intervened.
Informative, heartbreaking, and profoundly empowering, Tomorrow Will Be Different is McBride's story of love and loss and a powerful entry point into the LGBTQ community's battle for equal rights and what it means to be openly transgender. From issues like bathroom access to health care to gender in America, McBride weaves the important political and cultural milestones into a personal journey that will open hearts and change minds.
As McBride urges: "We must never be a country that says there's only one way to love, only one way to look, and only one way to live."
The fight for equality and freedom has only just begun.
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Excerpts-
  • From the book It's rare to know in real time that what you are about to do will define the course of the rest of your life. But as I sat at my laptop in the small office I had been given as student body president at American University, I knew that my world was about to turn upside down. I was about to reveal my deepest secret and take a step that just a few months before would have seemed impossible and unimaginable.

    My hand hovered over the keypad of my laptop, ready yet reluctant to click "post" on a Facebook note that would change my life forever. I could almost hear the responses I feared would come.

    What a freak.
    Ew.

    This is disgusting.

    And probably the most biting, because I was afraid it was true: Well, there goes any life and future for that kid.

    Throughout my whole life until this point, it had always seemed that my dreams and my identity were mutually exclusive. My life had been defined by a constant tension between the two: the belief—as certain as the color of the sky—that it was impossible for me to have a family, a career, fulfillment, while also embracing the truth that I am a transgender woman.

    For the first twenty-one years of my life, my dreams—the possibility of improving my world and making my family proud—had won out over my identity. But the older I got, the harder it became to rationalize away something that had become clear was the core of who I am. And by college, it had enveloped my whole being. It was present every second of my life.

    I no longer had a choice. I couldn't hide anymore. I couldn't continue living someone else's existence. I needed to come out. I needed to tell the world that I was transgender. I needed to live my own life as me.

    A little over a year before, I had been elected student body president at American University. AU, nestled between suburban neighbor- hoods in northwest Washington, D.C., is one of the most politically active schools in the country and boasts a rich history of political milestones. It was the site where John F. Kennedy called for "not merely peace in our time, but peace for all time" months after the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the home of the younger Ted Kennedy's pivotal endorsement of then-senator Barack Obama in the 2008 Democratic primary.

    I had always loved politics, advocacy, and government. They had seemed like the best way to improve my community and leave a lasting impact on the world. From the ages of six and seven, after discovering the White House and learning about all of the history that occurred within its walls, I knew that politics would be my life's calling.

    When I served as student body president at AU and began working on the issues I had always cared about—gender equity, racial justice, opportunity regardless of economic background, and, yes, LGBTQ equality—it became clear that making a difference in the world wouldn't diminish or dilute my own pain and incompleteness.

    I had come out to my parents over winter break in the middle of my yearlong term. Since then, I had come out to my closest friends, and as I woke up on the morning of April 30, 2012, my last day as student body president, I was resolved to announce to the world that I was really Sarah McBride.
About the Author-
  • Sarah McBride is the national press secretary at the Human Rights Campaign, working tirelessly to advocate for LGBTQ equality. She has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Time, Cosmopolitan, Elle, Vogue, Rolling Stone, and The New Yorker, and she speaks regularly at national LGBTQ and political events. A native of Delaware, McBride is on the front lines of the progressive movement.
Reviews-
  • Kirkus

    February 1, 2018
    A brave transgender woman experiences both triumph and tragedy in this memoir of transitioning and so much more.McBride, the national press secretary for the Human Rights Campaign, was a high school political activist well before coming to terms with her gender identity, so this mix of policy discussion and personal revelation seems to come naturally to her. What she had never expected is that she would be a widow at 24 and, two years later, become the first transgender speaker at a national political convention. The author first came to national attention in college, when, as student body president of American University, she announced first through social media and then in the pages of the school newspaper that she was transgender. She had previously presented herself outwardly as male. She was scared of rejection or even ridicule from the campus culture, but she received "a total and overwhelming outpouring of love and joy." However, McBride's earlier experience coming out to her parents had been more traumatic. Even though they were progressive and supportive of her gay older brother, they had been blindsided by her declaration. "So you want to be a girl?" asked her tearful mother, who later said, "I feel like my life is over." "I didn't want to be a girl. I was a girl," thought the author, who had felt like a girl in a boy's body since she was 10 and who had since recognized that if this were in fact a choice, it was the only choice she could make. She became an activist and eloquent spokesperson for LGBTQ legislation, the first transgender intern to serve at the White House, and an inspirational speaker at the Democratic National Convention. She also fell deeply in love with another activist, who would soon succumb to cancer, but not before they had the chance to marry. Throughout, the author ably balances great accomplishments and strong emotions.Reading McBride's inspiring story will make it harder to ostracize or demonize others with similar stories to share.

    COPYRIGHT(2018) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Publisher's Weekly

    February 5, 2018
    This moving account of an activist’s coming of age opens in 2012, on the day McBride came out as a trans woman. She was at the end of her term as student body president at American University in Washington, D.C. As a young person active in politics who had wrestled for years with a growing awareness of her gender identity, McBride knew her decision to come out at age 21 would “define the course of the rest of life,” and her candid memoir charts that whirlwind course in the subsequent five years. McBride writes of her internship in the Office of Public Engagement at the White House during the Obama administration, her work advocating for the passage of Delaware’s Gender Identity Nondiscrimination Act of 2013, and her 2016 address before the Democratic National Convention: “It’s impossible to express the profound liberation of being able to do something as your true self when, for years, you’ve never been able to actually be yourself.” Inextricably linked to her work for LGBTQ rights is the story of the romance between her and her late husband, Andrew Cray, a fellow activist whom she met in 2012 and married in 2014—just four days before Cray’s death from cancer at the age of 28. McBride’s intimate story of fighting for social justice in the midst of heartbreak will resonate with many readers.

  • Library Journal

    March 1, 2018

    In her first book, activist McBride (national press secretary, Human Rights Campaign) shows self-awareness and purpose. Cognizant of the many positives in her life--supportive family, friends, and coworkers--McBride has devoted her career to ensuring equal rights for LGBTQ people. By sharing her own story of coming out, the author illuminates the pain that can come along with that process, and how she has arrived at accepting (and living) her life. She writes movingly of her experience transitioning from a man to a woman, and her political activism, along with falling in love and then losing her love to cancer. Statistics about the marginalization of and discrimination against the LGBTQ community, especially those who are transgender, are brought to life by her voice. The importance of telling these experiences in order to combat demonizing stereotypes is stressed by the author's experiences in passing civil rights legislation in Delaware, as well as her activism nationwide. The pressing need for broad antidiscrimination protection for the entire LGBTQ community is made clear. VERDICT All readers will find this book enlightening. Those struggling with gender identity, and their families and friends, will find hope in McBride's words.--Laurie Unger Skinner, Coll. of Lake Cty., Waukegan, IL

    Copyright 2018 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

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Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality
Sarah McBride
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