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Collaborate or Perish!
Cover of Collaborate or Perish!
Collaborate or Perish!
Reaching Across Boundaries in a Networked World
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In Collaborate or Perish! former Los Angeles police chief and New York police commissioner William Bratton and Harvard Kennedy School's Zachary Tumin lay out a field-tested playbook for collaborating across the boundaries of our networked world. Today, when everyone is connected, collaboration is the game changer. Agencies and firms, citizens and groups who can collaborate, Bratton and Tumin argue, will thrive in the networked world; those who can't are doomed to perish.

No one today is better known around the world for his ability to get citizens, governments, and industries working together to improve the safety of cities than William Bratton. At Harvard, Zachary Tumin has led senior executives from government and industry in executive sessions and classrooms for over a decade, burnishing a global reputation for insight and leadership. Together, Bratton and Tumin draw on in-depth accounts from Fortune 100 giants such as Alcoa, Wells Fargo, and Toyota; from masters of collaboration in education, social work, and the military; and from Bratton's own storied career. Among the specific strategies they reveal:

• Start collaboration with a broad vision that supporters can add to and make their own
• Rightsize problems, and get value in the hands of users fast
• Get the right people involved--from sponsors to grass roots
• Make collaboration pay in the right currency--whether recognition, rewards, or revenue

Today companies and managers face unique challenges--and opportunities--in reaching out to others, thanks to the incredibly connected world in which we live. Bratton and Tumin provide practical strategies anyone can use, from the cubicle to the boardroom. This is the ultimate guide to getting things done in today's networked world.



From the Hardcover edition.

In Collaborate or Perish! former Los Angeles police chief and New York police commissioner William Bratton and Harvard Kennedy School's Zachary Tumin lay out a field-tested playbook for collaborating across the boundaries of our networked world. Today, when everyone is connected, collaboration is the game changer. Agencies and firms, citizens and groups who can collaborate, Bratton and Tumin argue, will thrive in the networked world; those who can't are doomed to perish.

No one today is better known around the world for his ability to get citizens, governments, and industries working together to improve the safety of cities than William Bratton. At Harvard, Zachary Tumin has led senior executives from government and industry in executive sessions and classrooms for over a decade, burnishing a global reputation for insight and leadership. Together, Bratton and Tumin draw on in-depth accounts from Fortune 100 giants such as Alcoa, Wells Fargo, and Toyota; from masters of collaboration in education, social work, and the military; and from Bratton's own storied career. Among the specific strategies they reveal:

• Start collaboration with a broad vision that supporters can add to and make their own
• Rightsize problems, and get value in the hands of users fast
• Get the right people involved--from sponsors to grass roots
• Make collaboration pay in the right currency--whether recognition, rewards, or revenue

Today companies and managers face unique challenges--and opportunities--in reaching out to others, thanks to the incredibly connected world in which we live. Bratton and Tumin provide practical strategies anyone can use, from the cubicle to the boardroom. This is the ultimate guide to getting things done in today's networked world.



From the Hardcover edition.
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Excerpts-
  • Chapter One

    The Case for Collaboration

    THE HUNT FOR TEN RED BALLOONS

    On October 29, 2009, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced its "Network Challenge." At 10:00 a.m. on December 5, 2009, at ten locations throughout the United States, DARPA would let fly an eight-foot-diameter red weather balloon tethered to the ground. Each balloon would be readily visible from local roads and buildings--points the average person could reach. A $40,000 prize would go to the first team to accurately report the location of all ten weather balloons.

    The contest was meant to replicate the challenge of trying to gather information about an adversary in an open environment. DARPA wanted to test whether ordinary folks using commonly available off-the-shelf technology and social media like Twitter or Facebook could work together--collaborate--to solve a problem that would be, in the words of one expert from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, "impossible to solve by traditional intelligence gathering methods."

    A team from MIT's Media Lab won. No surprise there. MIT had a slew of faculty and top graduate students, the most sophisticated equipment, and great publicity. CNN profiled them and drew attention to their cause. A Georgia Tech team placed second, for similar reasons.

    Both teams competed fiercely. They put out misinformation, reporting false sightings, sent others on wild-goose chases, and bought time for themselves. Both teams wrote complex computer programs to defend themselves against such attacks.

    Given their advantages, you would expect MIT and Georgia Tech to come out ahead--and they did, with a winning time under nine hours.

    But what is interesting is the guy who finished in a tie for third with eight balloons, and actually led the pack for the first four hours of the competition--nineteen-year-old hacker George Hotz. Hotz heard about the contest only a couple of days before, and only an hour before it started he put up a website called Dudeitsaballoon.com.

    How did he do it? His idea was based on a kind of mass collaboration.

    Hotz had nearly fifty thousand followers on Twitter. They, in turn, had hundreds of thousands of followers. His plan was to mobilize them all--get thousands in the game and all those eyeballs searching for the prized red balloons. It almost worked.

    Hotz was already famous in the hacker community for "jailbreaking" the Sony PlayStation and the Apple iPhone. He'd cracked their proprietary codes, and for the iPhone wrote software that let iPhone owners use it on any wireless network, not just AT&T's--much to AT&T's and Apple's chagrin and the hacker community's glee.

    These legendary hacks made Hotz a star. He gained tens of thousands of Twitter followers, all of whom wanted to be the first to know what George Hotz might do next. On Twitter, they would soon find out.

    On the day before the DARPA contest, Hotz--who went by his Twitter name, @geohot--tweeted his followers to stand by for a major announcement the next day. That started a buzz going in the Twitterverse and on hacker bulletin boards.

    On Saturday morning @geohot tweeted his fifty thousand followers:

    10AM EST today marks the start of a US wide scavenger hunt, for 10 red balloons http://bit.ly/7chum5 #dudeitsaballoon

    He quickly followed up with another tweet:

    So I need your help to do two things, 1, find big red balloons, and 2, RT [retweet] and trend this !!!! http://bit.ly/7chum5 #dudeitsaballoon

    He included a link to his website. The hashtagged #dudeitsaballoon guaranteed that if his message got retweeted, as requested, #dudeitsaballoon would rise to the top of the...

About the Author-
  • WILLIAM J. BRATTON is chairman of Kroll, one of Altegrity, Inc.'s three core businesses. Mr. Bratton joined Altegrity in November 2009 after serving as chief of the Los Angeles Police Department for seven years. Prior, he served as chief of the New York City Transit Police and commissioner of the Boston Police Department and the New York City Police Department. A frequent lecturer, writer, and commentator, Bill Bratton is known as one of the world's premier police chiefs. Mr. Bratton also serves on the Motorola Solutions board of directors. In 2009 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II recognized Bratton with the honorary title of Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE).

    ZACHARY TUMIN
    is special assistant to the director and faculty chair of Harvard Kennedy School's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, the most recent of a number of key posts that Mr. Tumin has held at the school. In addition to leading research programs and executive teaching at Harvard, Mr. Tumin served in senior executive roles for industry and government, including as head of public safety for the New York City public schools, on the executive staffs of the Brooklyn District Attorney and the New York State Organized Crime Task Force, and as director of the Financial Services Technology Consortium. A frequent lecturer, Mr. Tumin is also author of numerous teaching cases, working papers, reports, and essays.

    www.brattonandtumin.com
Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    October 17, 2011
    In today’s competitive, global marketplace, the ability to collaborate with colleagues, business partners, other companies, and even other governments is more critical than ever. Former LAPD and NYC police commissioner Bratton and Harvard professor Tumin have joined forces to create this playbook on how to reach across boundaries to share information and get results. Using stories from their own experiences, the authors illustrate how radical collaboration can create new opportunities and enable companies, government agencies, and the military to compete. Among the diverse success stories highlighted are IBM, VISA, President Obama’s campaign, and the Massachusetts Division of Social Services. Additionally, Bratton draws heavily on his law enforcement experience to show examples of “in the trenches” collaboration, including the NYPD’s use of Compstat, a digital collaboration mapping New York’s neighborhoods. These real-life stories bring the concept of collaboration to life and underscore the importance of breaking down barriers in order to survive in an increasingly competitive world.

  • Kirkus

    November 15, 2011
    A guide to previously unattainable levels of collaboration and control in a networked global environment. It would be hard to argue that collaboration was ever an entirely alien concept in government, business or private spheres. What former Boston, New York City and Los Angeles police chief Bratton (The Turnaround, 1998) and co-author Tumin assert is that technologically up-to-the-moment collaboration is now virtually a matter of survival. Either learn to create shared-goal cyber platforms linking all the players or, as they exclaim in their title, perish! With Bratton drawing on his front-line policing experiences, the authors present a series of highly informative, wide-ranging and frequently unsettling examples showing the rapidly expanding impact of collaboration-enhancing technology. They also suggest techniques for effective collaboration, ranging from right-sizing problems to coercing participation, if it comes to that. Their purpose, they write, is to share the wisdom they have gathered over their 40-year careers from government leaders, top executives, managers, researchers and others. "It is a book that will help you collaborate better," they write, "and get on with the business of transforming the world as it is into the world that should be"--though they never get around to explaining the exact nature of that world. That it might be repressive, given the immense new powers of top-down control that come with collaboration as the book defines it, never arises as a topic. Mostly enlightening reading for understanding what the world is becoming.

    (COPYRIGHT (2011) KIRKUS REVIEWS/NIELSEN BUSINESS MEDIA, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.)

  • Library Journal

    November 1, 2011

    In this book about problem solving through collaboration, Bratton, former police chief of New York City, Boston, and Los Angeles, along with Tumin (John F. Kennedy Sch. of Government, Harvard), provides many successful examples of his philosophy in action taken from personal experience, international politics (e.g., the rescue of FARC-held hostages in Colombia), U.S. policy, industry, education, and health care. Inserted among these accounts are nuggets of commonsense information on, e.g., how to encourage and facilitate collaboration and ways to achieve buy-in from parties with divergent interests. These include ideas on "right-sizing," or simplifying, problems; assembling teams; getting out of one's "silo" (broadening one's perspective); and building trust. There are lots of good ideas here, but--other than what can be gleaned from the anecdotes that make up the majority of the text--no real suggestions on how to implement them. VERDICT An engaging book filled with real-world examples of successful (and some failed) collaborations around the world but offering little new data or insight. Optional; purchase where there's interest.--Susan Hurst, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH

    Copyright 2011 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Sullenberger, author of Highest Duty: My Search for What Really Matters. "Bratton and Tumin give example after vivid example of something I have long believed: that by creating a vision, aligning goals, breaking down barriers, and working together to innovate, we can achieve results that few thought possible." ―Captain Chesley "Sully"
  • ―Professor Renée Mauborgne, INSEAD, coauthor of the international bestseller Blue Ocean Strategy "Collaborate or Perish! is a brilliant guide replete with sound practical insight into what it takes to successfully collaborate in today's highly networked world. Bratton and Tumin skillfully use their own experiences and fascinating analyses of business, high-stakes national defense issues, and government to bring their ideas to life."
  • Gen Michael V. Hayden, USAF (ret.), and former Director, National Security Agency and Central Intelligence Agency "Collaborate or Perish packs a powerful one-two punch: practical street-smart experience lashed up to a coherent intellectual framework for managing and fostering change. It's a user's down-to-earth guide for transforming a traditional hierarchy into an agile, self-sustaining network. I only wish I had such a guide in some of my former government positions."
  • ―Greg Brown, chairman and CEO of Motorola "The velocity of the things and events around us are accelerating faster than ever. Chief Bratton and Zach Tumin have insightfully captured that our individual effectiveness must be multiplied through people, platforms, and unparalleled passion."
  • ―Graydon Carter, editor of Vanity Fair "Bill Bratton is the Vince Lombardi of the security game. And in Collaborate or Perish!, he and Zach Tumin explain the roots of this success: building a team, unifying a team, and then getting results through leadership and collaboration."
  • Leonard Stern, chairman and CEO of the Hartz Group "Becoming more effective and succeeding is a goal most of us share. Now William Bratton and Zachary Tumin focus on the power of effective collaboration, citing real-life examples as the key to real success. Their insight together with their extremely readable story clearly and convincingly explain why "going it alone" no longer works in our increasingly connected society."
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