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The Prince and the Porker

Cover of The Prince and the Porker

The Prince and the Porker

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Pignatius was passing the palace one day, when he saw ten fresh buns left to cool on a tray...

When Pignatius sees fresh pastries cooling on the windowsill of the palace kitchen, he's tempted to try them. Surely, the cook won't miss just one. But Pignatius's greed gets the better of him, and he eats all the buns before sneaking into the palace in search of more treats. Before long, he finds himself in the prince's room trying on a wig and some clothes, and the servants mistake him for the real prince! When the actual prince returns, Pignatius fears the worst, but the prince saves Pignatius's bacon instead. It turns out that the prince has always wanted a double to deal with a particularly frightening problem—his aunt Alice! This hilarious reimagining of Mark Twain's classic The Prince and the Pauper is sure to make kids laugh with its clever rhyming text and delicious, dessert-filled illustrations by New York Times bestselling illustrator David Roberts.

Pignatius was passing the palace one day, when he saw ten fresh buns left to cool on a tray...

When Pignatius sees fresh pastries cooling on the windowsill of the palace kitchen, he's tempted to try them. Surely, the cook won't miss just one. But Pignatius's greed gets the better of him, and he eats all the buns before sneaking into the palace in search of more treats. Before long, he finds himself in the prince's room trying on a wig and some clothes, and the servants mistake him for the real prince! When the actual prince returns, Pignatius fears the worst, but the prince saves Pignatius's bacon instead. It turns out that the prince has always wanted a double to deal with a particularly frightening problem—his aunt Alice! This hilarious reimagining of Mark Twain's classic The Prince and the Pauper is sure to make kids laugh with its clever rhyming text and delicious, dessert-filled illustrations by New York Times bestselling illustrator David Roberts.

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About the Author-
  • Peter Bently has written several award-winning picture books, including King Jack and the Dragon. He lives with his wife, Lucy, and two teenage children in Devon, England.

Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    January 2, 2017
    One morning, a pig named Pignatius eats 10 buns he finds cooling outside the palace, dips inside to explore, then flees the outraged cook: “The bedroom was splendid. The pig was impressed./ He chuckled, ‘There’s even a dressing-up chest!’ ” When Pignatius dons the blue satin suit and frizzy red wig he finds stored there, he looks enough like the palace’s prince to fool the staff: “The cook is mistaken, it’s quite clear to see./ Now what does Your Highness desire for his tea?” Between the time that Pignatius discovers that he can pass for the prince and the moment the real prince returns, Pignatius enjoys himself thoroughly, eating whatever he likes and ordering the palace soldiers about. Unlike other trading-places fables, neither the prince nor Pignatius is especially virtuous, a fact mirrored in Roberts’s (Ada Twist, Scientist) sly visual parallel between the piggy prince and the princely pig. Bently’s (Captain Jack and the Pirates) cheeky verse never stumbles, and Roberts has rousing fun with classic set pieces: trays of treats, palace luxury, angry servants, and straight-faced guards. Delectable, mischievous fun. Ages 5–7.

  • Kirkus

    December 15, 2016
    Pignatius the pig learns that clothes make the man--er, prince. While strolling past the palace one day, Pignatius spots a tray of fresh buns cooling near an open door. He makes short, delicious work of them and, figuring that there might be more inside, enters the palace. In the kitchen, he downs a big jar of cream, scaring the cook in the process. Ascending the winding staircase, Pignatius enters a sumptuous bedroom decorated all in blue, pokes around in a "dressing-up chest," and finds breaches, buckles, and a big orange wig, all of which he dons. The cook and a clutch of servants burst into the room with makeshift weapons--and immediately bow and apologize! Pignatius eats a luscious feast and inspects the new guard. Then his impish side takes over; he instructs them to hop like frogs and blows up the gardener's prize pumpkin. Pignatius is enjoying a tub of sweets when in strides...the genuine prince, a dead ringer for the costumed pig. Bently's rhymed reworking of the Mark Twain classic is appropriately silly; young readers should identify with Pignatius' curiosity and mischief. Roberts' elegant yet loopy illustrations--in watercolors, pen, and ink--are a big enhancement. A dark-skinned duchess, footman, and some guards lend diversity to the otherwise white cast, all of whom are fitted out in an agreeable mishmash of ornate frills and furbelows. Peachy. (Picture book. 4-7)

    COPYRIGHT(2016) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    January 1, 2017

    PreS-Gr 2-A picture book play on The Prince and the Pauper. Bently's story, told in tongue-tickling rhyme, follows Pignatius, a pig, as he goes about achieving his goal of having some delicious snacks. In the palace, the porker's resemblance to the royal allows him to impersonate the prince and feast on endless desserts. Inset, framed illustrations; scrollwork; and battalions of soldiers add plenty of fun visual details. Pignatius fares well after he's discovered by the prince. (One might even suspect that the prince knew all along.) Deciding that a double could come in handy when unpleasant Aunt Alice comes to visit, the prince permits Pignatius to remain at the palace and continue his feasting. VERDICT This tale will appeal to both younger and older picture book readers and fans of seriously silly titles such as Jon Scieszka's The True Story of the Three Little Pigs.-Paige Mellinger, Gwinnett County Public Library, Lawrenceville, GA

    Copyright 2017 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

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